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Wednesday, November 6
 

8:00am EST

Aboriginal Coaching Modules
Wednesday November 6, 2019 8:00am - 6:00pm EST
Albemarle Hall

3:00pm EST

Conference Registration
Wednesday November 6, 2019 3:00pm - 7:00pm EST
Cottage Row

4:00pm EST

NASSS Board Meeting & Dinner
Wednesday November 6, 2019 4:00pm - 7:00pm EST
Restaurant

7:00pm EST

Welcome Reception
Please join us for socializing, light appetizers, and an open bar conference as we celebrate the start of this year’s conference. In conjunction with the “Virginia Beach +1” initiative, veteran NASSS attendees are encouraged to introduce themselves to new attendees.

Wednesday November 6, 2019 7:00pm - 10:00pm EST
Peacock Foyer
 
Thursday, November 7
 

7:00am EST

DCCC Meeting & Breakfast
Thursday November 7, 2019 7:00am - 8:00am EST
Restaurant

7:30am EST

Conference Registration
Thursday November 7, 2019 7:30am - 11:30am EST
Cottage Row

8:00am EST

#ReclaimingMyTime: Reclaiming Sport Narratives I
In 2017, Congresswoman Maxine Waters stated the infamous House floor procedure phrase of, "Reclaiming my time". Such a phrase, went viral for its symbolic underpinning of a confident Black woman "reclaiming her time" in a space that refused to acknowledge her authority and power. The phrase, "reclaiming my time" has transcended House floor procedure and is now used in popular culture to address instances of subordination of certain identity groups. This session will highlight sport narratives that need to be reclaimed due to misinformation, wrongly purported messages, and lack of knowledge about certain experiences and narratives within sport. The reclaiming of narratives is the focus of this session.

Presenters:
Michael Mallery Jr.
Marques Dexter
Jonathan Howe

Thursday November 7, 2019 8:00am - 9:00am EST
Albemarle Hall

8:00am EST

A Colonial Relationship: The Black Athlete and Institutional Development
Intercollegiate athletics, more specifically football and men’s basketball, are major global representatives of universities as a whole, and they are critical to the institutional development, including advancement and fundraising, for these universities. Within this context, the Black athletic body is a premium at universities that once had strong colonial connections, they created enormous endowments from slavery and slave labor, and some of these institutions denied admission to Blacks for over a hundred years. Predominantly white institutions of higher education (PWIHE) have relaxed their restrictive anti-Black admission policies in order to capitalize on this commodity; once again colonizing the Black body for the extraction of athletic labor and use the Black athletic body for institutional development purposes. This session seeks to examine this paradox and interrogate the oppressive and racist athletic structures that continually colonize the Black body for institutional development and the academy that neglects the Black mind.

Presenters:
Justin Garner & John Singer
Tracie Canada
Trajuan Briggs & Dr. Allison Smith
A. Lamont Williams

Thursday November 7, 2019 8:00am - 9:00am EST
Princess Anne

8:00am EST

Coaching Cultures and Discourses
Through the work of a number of NASSS members, it is evident that what is largely driving decision-making and problem-solving in a multitude of sport contexts today, as well as what purports to represent innovation in sport, is the result of sport’s increasingly aggressive profit orientation and uncritical reliance on the sport sciences. For many individuals working in various capacities in sport, this condition may not be what they thought they signed up for. Rather, what they believed they were signing up for was participation in an activity that values above all else the human desire for self-expression and the pleasure that arises from improvement and challenging one’s limits in healthy and appropriate ways. This session is intended to explore the tensions individuals engaged in one way or another in sport today experience when faced with this contradiction and the actions they have taken in response.

Presenters:
Annelies Knoppers & Donna De Haan
HE Jun & Molly Cotner
Jim Denison

Thursday November 7, 2019 8:00am - 9:00am EST
Peacock A

8:00am EST

Decolonizing ‘sport’ and ‘development’ in sport-for-development and peace I
In the field of sport-for-development and peace (SDP), decolonizing approaches have been both advocated and employed for the purposes of scholarly investigation and practice (Darnell & Hayhurst, 2011; Oxford, 2019). This session seeks to build on these discussions relating to decolonization and to advance theoretical, conceptual, methodological, and practical insights into how SDP is researched and conducted. In line with the conference theme, we invite papers that engage with decolonial approaches in order to question the dominant meanings of ‘sport’, ‘development’, and the growing ‘SDP’ movement/industry/institution, particularly through Indigenous and marginalized perspectives. Questions we hope to explore include both substantive and methodological concerns, such as: How may research in local contexts, that adopts a decolonial approach, inform the international field of SDP? What are some of the complications, contradictions, and concerns that may arise through adopting decolonial approaches to research and SDP? All paper presentations that revolve around such questions and others related to SDP and the conference theme are invited.

Presenters:
Mitchell McSweeney, Lyndsay Hayhurst, Jeanette Steinmann, Emerald Bandoles, & Brian Wilson
Jeanette Steinmann, Brian Wilson, Lyndsay Hayhurst, Mitchell McSweeney, & Emerald Bandoles
Meredith Whitley

Thursday November 7, 2019 8:00am - 9:00am EST
Avamere

8:00am EST

Examining Athlete Development Across the Sporting Landscape I
Sport is a billion-dollar industry and often the business side of sport seems to overshadow the athlete as a person. This session will explore a variety of issues that exist surrounding athlete development. Athlete development sees the athlete as a whole person and focuses on both the athletic and personal development of the athlete. This session invites papers that examine the athlete development process and the athlete experience. How can we use this research to create better experiences for the athlete? Topics presented in this session may include, but are not limited to, the sociological aspects of athlete development, athletic identify, transitions, academic support, social justice and activism, athlete wellbeing, character and leadership development, and career development. Papers submitted to this session should emphasize the athlete over profits and address implications for practitioners.

Presenters:
Matt Ventresca & William Bridel
Dominic Morais & Victoria Trabysh
Patrick Gentile

Thursday November 7, 2019 8:00am - 9:00am EST
Spotswood Arms

8:00am EST

Off the Beaten Tenure-Track
Neoliberal universities constantly cut labor costs by replacing tenure track positions with (permanently) temporary workers. This leads many into a variety of contingent position that may be more or less desirable and sustainable. Intended audience: Graduate students, recent graduates

Presenters:
Brenda Riemer
Jerry Holt
Aaron Miller

Thursday November 7, 2019 8:00am - 9:00am EST
Peacock C

8:00am EST

Teaching Strategies to Promote Active Learning in Sport Sociology
This panel session invites participants to share what teaching strategies they utilize to promote active learning in sport sociology-related undergraduate and graduate courses. Panelists will be asked to offer what specific teaching strategies they are currently using in addition to discussing what student feedback related to these teaching strategies has been. In an effort to connect the panel discussion with the conference theme, examples of activities that encourage students to reflect upon the ways in which power and oppression work through and within sport are especially encouraged.

Presenters:
Nicolle Skoien
Megan Parietti
Christopher Brown

Thursday November 7, 2019 8:00am - 9:00am EST
Peacock B

8:00am EST

Exhibits
Thursday November 7, 2019 8:00am - 5:30pm EST
Prefunction Area

9:10am EST

#Metoo and Sport Professions: Examining Education, Training, and Response to Sexual Harassment
The purpose of this session is to explore how individuals in sport professions are affected by sexual harassment. Over the past few years, we have learned and researched the realities of sexual harassment by coaches and doctors, but there has been less research and media attention on the topic of sexual harassment within other sport professions. Are we overlooking the experiences of individuals in such fields as athletic training, sport performance, and marketing (just to name a few)? The oppression of females in sport through sexual harassment also serves to reduce the number of women in the field. Papers exploring any of these areas of sexual harassment are welcome.

Presenters:
Nikki Coutsouros, Sydney Socha, Erin Morris, Lindsey Darvin
Brenda A. Riemer, Erica J. Zonder & Jodi Schumacher
Maura Rosenthal, Nicole Robitaille & Cathy van Ingen

Thursday November 7, 2019 9:10am - 10:10am EST
Courtney Terrace

9:10am EST

#ReclaimingMyTime: Reclaiming Sport Narratives II
In 2017, Congresswoman Maxine Waters stated the infamous House floor procedure phrase of, "Reclaiming my time". Such a phrase, went viral for its symbolic underpinning of a confident Black woman "reclaiming her time" in a space that refused to acknowledge her authority and power. The phrase, "reclaiming my time" has transcended House floor procedure and is now used in popular culture to address instances of subordination of certain identity groups. This session will highlight sport narratives that need to be reclaimed due to misinformation, wrongly purported messages, and lack of knowledge about certain experiences and narratives within sport. The reclaiming of narratives is the focus of this session.

Presenters:
Tiara Cash
Joseph Cooper & Dr. J. Keith Motley
Nathan Towery & Nicholas Buzzelli

Thursday November 7, 2019 9:10am - 10:10am EST
Spotswood Arms

9:10am EST

College Athlete Advocacy Within the Global Athlete Advocacy Movement
Numerous scholars and commentators have concluded the NCAA has built its business on the exploitation of “Power-5” football and men’s basketball, the majority of whom are racial minorities whose welfare is jeopardized by a conflict-ridden power base that favors those in control and whose value is suppressed by an elaborate regulatory system (Byers, 1995; Hawkins, 2010; Southall & Staurowsky, 2013). Our discussion of college athletes, labor, and advocacy within the broader global athletes-rights movement will be framed by Schwab’s (2018) theoretical conception of the role athlete activism can play in reconciling sport with human rights. Specifically, we will: (1) Critique NCAA responses to two lawsuits (Alston v. NCAA, 2019; O’Bannon v. NCAA, 2015) that found the NCAA to be in violation of federal antitrust law. (2) Discuss efforts to organize players and challenge NCAA hegemony (College Athlete Advocacy Initiative; College Athlete Players Association; National College Players Association). (3) Engage session attendees.

Presenters:
Richard Southall
Tim Nevius
Eric Kindler

Thursday November 7, 2019 9:10am - 10:10am EST
Avamere

9:10am EST

Decolonizing College Sport Research: Ethics and broader questions
This session will interrogate coloniality in research ‘on’ college athletes and athletics. Scholars have compared the unique model of U.S. college sport to slavery, a monopoly, and a cartel (Barro, 2002; Eitzen, 2016; Fleisher, Goff, & Tollison, 1992; Nocera & Strauss, 2018). Similarly, we apply settler colonialism to college athletics, focusing on how researchers’ methods may perpetuate it (Patel, 2016). Papers in this session will reimagine research methods to challenge settler colonialism as it exists in dominant methodological approaches to college sport in North America. As such, we invite participants to reframe research as ‘with’ college athletes, rather than ‘on’ them. Potential paper topics might include: examining coercive participant recruitment tactics; proposing data collection methods that disrupt vertical interviewer-participant power relationships; interrogating the concept of college athlete as perpetual object rather than subject; examining how race and/or gender interact with settler colonialism, or any number of other topics connecting intercollegiate athletics research to decolonial methods. Presentations should offer concrete recommendations for researchers’ practice.

Presenters:
Michael Friedman & Brandon Wallace
Brandon Chandler & Kirsten M. Hextrum
Ryan King-White, Michael Giardina, & Avanti Kolluri

Thursday November 7, 2019 9:10am - 10:10am EST
Peacock B

9:10am EST

Decolonizing Methodologists: Critical reflections on anti-colonial research I
There is a move to decolonize methodologies across the social sciences. Such approaches are attuned to colonial histories and social formations, and often provide researchers with theories, guidelines, tools and methods of data collection/analysis necessary to deconstruct colonial hierarchies and epistemologies in and through research. As scholars who have attempted to approach our research in this way, we submit that such approaches are useful, but also insufficient. In addition to decolonizing methodologies, what is needed is for researchers (i.e. the methodologists) to decolonize their own experiences, subjectivities, histories in, and complicity with colonialism and imperialism in its various forms, particularly for the ways in which such experiences inform and even infiltrate the research process. In this session, we invite presentations that offer such reflections, with particular consideration of how sharing such experiences might support the sociology of sport community in continuing the work of decolonizing our research.


Presenters:
Jay Johnson, Bree Langlais, Madeline Ponask, & Aaron Fontaine
Samuel Clevenger
Tavis Smith

Thursday November 7, 2019 9:10am - 10:10am EST
Albemarle Hall

9:10am EST

Divergent perspectives: Post-Title IX adolescents’ views of female athletes
In the current post-Title IX sport climate, representations of female athletes range from highlighting competence to replicating heteronormativity (Fink, 2015). The framing of the image impacts how adolescent boys and girls interpret female athleticism (Daniels & Wartena, 2011). The present study extends our earlier work (e.g. Krane et al., 2011). In focus groups, 57 boy and girl athletes discussed photos of a diverse group of female athletes (Barak et al., 2018). We employed thematic analysis (Braun & Clarke, 2006) to carefully analyze written transcripts. In our session we will (a) share our feminist cultural studies framework, discuss current literature, and present prior findings; (b) explain the often divergent perspectives of adolescent girl and boy athletes toward female athleticism; (c) reveal skepticism that girl athletes have about boys’ attitudes toward female athletes; and; (d) share reasons for optimism and propose strategies to help the sport context become more equitable.

Presenters:
Sally R. Ross
Chelsea Kaunert W.
Katie Sullivan Barak
Vikki Krane

Thursday November 7, 2019 9:10am - 10:10am EST
Peacock A

9:10am EST

Going on the Job Market
For many scholars, the most stressful part of the academic journey is getting your first tenure-track job. How then do you navigate an increasingly competitive job market? Intended audience: Graduate students, recent graduates, job seekers

Facilitators:
Tricia McGuire-Adams
Gary Sailes
Christopher M. McLeod
Robert Turick

Thursday November 7, 2019 9:10am - 10:10am EST
Peacock C

10:20am EST

Building Sport, Building Sports Spaces
Participants:
Beth Cavalier
Brendan O'Hallarn & William T. Heffelfinger
Andrew D. Linden & Lindsay Parks Pieper

Thursday November 7, 2019 10:20am - 11:35am EST
Spotswood Arms

10:20am EST

Fighting Matters: ‘Violent’ Performance, (Post-)Colonialism, and the Body – Critical perspectives on ‘violent’ sports
C8 This panel session will explore ways in which sociological significance extends from and through the ‘fighting body’, broadly conceived in terms of individual bodies that fight, as well as social bodies of fighters in the plural. With a primary focus on relations of power, performance, and social change, the panel will feature papers exploring the ways in which martial arts, combat sports, and related activities reflect, recreate or offer the opportunity to resist various matrices of domination. The panel specifically invites work that interrogates these issues at the intersection of globalisation, (post-)colonialism, and/or indigenous knowledge and identities, in line with the conference theme; however, papers which do not explicitly foreground these topics are also welcomed. Collectively, the panel will illustrate the sociological uniqueness of fighting within sporting and similar contexts, particularly through reflecting on how apparently ‘violent’ practices amplify or subvert existing narratives pertinent to the session’s conceptual themes.

Presenters:
Dafna Kaufman
Martine Dennie
John Deidouss
Ally Quinney & Kailash Koushik

Thursday November 7, 2019 10:20am - 11:35am EST
Avamere

10:20am EST

Film Screening: Completing the Circle – Native American Athletes Giving Back to Their Community (Natalie Welch, 2018)
A 17-minute documentary that explores the narratives of three Native American athletes at different stages of their careers and how “giving back” has become an integral part of their lives; followed by Q&A with the director.

Thursday November 7, 2019 10:20am - 11:35am EST
Peacock C

10:20am EST

Gender Representation in Sport: Policy vs. Practice
Presenters:
Michele K. Donnelly
Jada Crocker & Pierre Rodgers
Shruti Sharma

Thursday November 7, 2019 10:20am - 11:35am EST
Princess Anne

10:20am EST

Sport and Race
Presenters:
Mr. Bachir Sirois-Moumni & Dr. Jean-Charles St. Louis
Wardell Johnson & Charles Crowley
Adam Love
Kelly Poniatowski
J.D. Simkins & Jacqueline McDowell

Thursday November 7, 2019 10:20am - 11:35am EST
Courtney Terrace

10:20am EST

The Opportunity for Profit to College Student-Athletes– Analysis Study
Collegiate student-athletes dedicate a lot of time and energy to perfect their craft. The likelihood of a high school student-athlete playing on a collegiate level is extremely low. This number drops even lower when it comes to student-athletes who receive full-ride scholarships. Although some of these college student-athletes compensated in the forms of educational opportunities or academic scholarship, they are still living at or beneath the national poverty level. College student-athletes governed by the NCAA, a nonprofit organization that regulates collegiate sports. Not only does this study emphasize the livelihood of college student-athletes and the rules they must follow, but it also examines the possible opportunities that college student-athletes have, such as other future compensation opportunities in addition to their scholarships. Also, this recent study looked at “celebrity” coaches, their salaries, and the lack of money student-athletes playing under these coaches are allowed to receive.

Presenters:
Ezzeldin R. Aly
Robyn Magee
Benjamin Hartmann
Jared Brown
Ecenur Yurdakaul
Yahia E. Aly
Jerry Goodsen

Thursday November 7, 2019 10:20am - 11:35am EST
Peacock A

10:20am EST

The Spectacle of the Athletic Body I
A half-century ago, theorist Guy Debord (1967) identified the “spectacle,” his term for commodified imagery, as pervasive in contemporary life. Drawing on this concept’s influential legacy, this panel turns to the athletic body as a central piece of social spectacle. A focus on the body enables analysis of how the material (flesh, blood, bone, etc.) is transformed into mediated commodity, how the “real” is made “hyperreal.” While this spectacularization is amplified in the age of digital/social media, contributors are also encouraged to examine historical representations of the athletic body. Following the panel’s critical focus on articulations of power and identity, contributors may address how mediation has been intertwined with colonization, particularly of those athletes whose bodies reflect marginalized identities.

Presenters:
Derek Silva
Nathan Kalman-Lamb
Justin Lovich
Branden Buehler

Thursday November 7, 2019 10:20am - 11:35am EST
Albemarle Hall

10:20am EST

Women’s sportswear relative to social justice
Whether embossed with slogans (such as “Gender is a social construct,” “Nevertheless, she persisted,” or “Injustice for some is injustice for all”), colored or crowned by emblematic symbols, the outfits that female athletes wear might be pre-ordained by a sporting organization or simply the athleisurewear of individual choice. Yet, as in the arena of Sport for Development (S4D), much of women’s sportswear remains dependent upon societal notions, constrained by religious protocol, patriarchal controls, peer pressures, even industry-chosen construction. Equally important is examining where, and by whom, and under what conditions it is produced. As women’s sports become ever more accepted, it is time to examine how their clothing fits, literally, into the fabric of a discussion on decolonial praxis.

Panelists:
Shannon Scovel
Najat AlSaied
Leandra Hinojosa Hernandez
Jacob Bustad, Jaime DeLuca & Michelina Quartucci
Judy Liao

Thursday November 7, 2019 10:20am - 11:35am EST
Peacock B

12:35pm EST

DCC Workshop
Thursday November 7, 2019 12:35pm - 1:35pm EST
Courtney Terrace

12:35pm EST

Decolonizing College Sport Research: Methods focus
This session will interrogate coloniality in research ‘on’ college athletes and athletics. Scholars have compared the unique model of U.S. college sport to slavery, a monopoly, and a cartel (Barro, 2002; Eitzen, 2016; Fleisher, Goff, & Tollison, 1992; Nocera & Strauss, 2018). Similarly, we apply settler colonialism to college athletics, focusing on how researchers’ methods may perpetuate it (Patel, 2016). Papers in this session will reimagine research methods to challenge settler colonialism as it exists in dominant methodological approaches to college sport in North America. As such, we invite participants to reframe research as ‘with’ college athletes, rather than ‘on’ them. Potential paper topics might include: examining coercive participant recruitment tactics; proposing data collection methods that disrupt vertical interviewer-participant power relationships; interrogating the concept of college athlete as perpetual object rather than subject; examining how race and/or gender interact with settler colonialism, or any number of other topics connecting intercollegiate athletics research to decolonial methods. Presentations should offer concrete recommendations for researchers’ practice.

Presenters:
Emma L. Allen, Siduri J. Haslerig, & Kirsten M. Hextrum
Kristi Oshiro & John Singer
Sara E. Grummert

Thursday November 7, 2019 12:35pm - 1:35pm EST
Peacock A

12:35pm EST

Decolonizing Methodologists: Critical reflections on anti-colonial research II
There is a move to decolonize methodologies across the social sciences. Such approaches are attuned to colonial histories and social formations, and often provide researchers with theories, guidelines, tools and methods of data collection/analysis necessary to deconstruct colonial hierarchies and epistemologies in and through research. As scholars who have attempted to approach our research in this way, we submit that such approaches are useful, but also insufficient. In addition to decolonizing methodologies, what is needed is for researchers (i.e. the methodologists) to decolonize their own experiences, subjectivities, histories in, and complicity with colonialism and imperialism in its various forms, particularly for the ways in which such experiences inform and even infiltrate the research process. In this session, we invite presentations that offer such reflections, with particular consideration of how sharing such experiences might support the sociology of sport community in continuing the work of decolonizing our research.

Presenters:
Alexandra (AJ) Rankin-Wright & Kevin Hylton
Simon C. Darnell & Madison Danford
Mike Dao

Thursday November 7, 2019 12:35pm - 1:35pm EST
Peacock B

12:35pm EST

Indigenous-Settler Allyship in Sport Studies: A Critical Conversation
In a panel discussion at 2018 NASSS Conference, Chen Chen, C. Richard King, John Singer, Tricia McGuire-Adams, Natalie Welch started a conversation on: How could meaningful allyships be built between sport scholars who examine race (and other social justice projects) and those who pursue decolonizing projects that challenge the foundation of settler colonialism? While receiving a considerable amount of positive feedback, the panel sees the value of extending the critical conversation to future NASSS conferences. These topics of discussion are especially important considering the “United States of America’s” white nationalist churn and the prominence of Native Americans in the current U.S. socio-political landscape. This panel will continue to explore barriers and opportunities for settler scholars of various backgrounds in building ethical, responsible, accountable, and long-lasting relations with Indigenous scholars and communities, part of which will illustrate ways in which NASSS can become a space that is generative to, rather than hindering of, these relations.

Presenters:
Natalie Welch
John N. Singer
Tricia McGuire-Adams
Ellen Staurowsky

Thursday November 7, 2019 12:35pm - 1:35pm EST
Albemarle Hall

12:35pm EST

Navigating The Tenure Track
You landed a tenure-track job – hurray. But five or six years to complete an often times nebulous list of requirements that might either lead to a “job for life” or a new career, what do you do? Intended audience: Graduate students, junior faculty, mid-career faculty

Facilitators:
Faye L. Wachs
Michael Messner
Heather Van Mullem
Bob Case

Thursday November 7, 2019 12:35pm - 1:35pm EST
Peacock C

12:35pm EST

Political Economies of Sport and the Active Body – Political Economic Structures, Processes, and Power
This session will provide a forum for scholars looking to share their research on the political economies of sport and the active body. Scholars are encouraged to submit both theoretical and empirical research on the behavioral, developmental, and sociological economies of sport, physical culture, and fitness active body. Submissions are welcome to take on a diverse array of subjects including (but not limited to) sport mega-events, professional sport leagues, sport stadiums and urban development, issues of social and economic (in)justice in collegiate sport, and economies of fitness and physical culture.

Presenters:
Kelly Ylitalo & Andrew Meyer
Adam Beissel & Neal Ternes
Caitlin Clarke

Thursday November 7, 2019 12:35pm - 1:35pm EST
Princess Anne

12:35pm EST

Politics and Protest I
Presenters:
Cerianne Robertson
Ann Pegoraro
Larissa Lara & Vitor Hugo Marani

Thursday November 7, 2019 12:35pm - 1:35pm EST
Avamere

12:35pm EST

Reading Susan Birrell Critically: Tales of Her Impact on the Field
Susan Birrell will retire in December 2019 after 40 years at the University of Iowa. Professor Birrell’s groundbreaking scholarship has both contributed to and expanded the boundaries of the Sociology of Sport. Importantly, she was among the first scholars in North America to apply feminist analyses to sport. She has additionally made contributions to the area of critical race theory and sport including an important essay in the Sociology of Sport Journal in 1989, “Race Relations Theories and Sport: Suggestions for a More Critical Analysis.” Dr. Birrell is also among the first scholars to introduce key aspects of British Cultural Studies to sport scholars and she has also written about intersectionality and sport. Her scholarship on narrative analysis and intertextuality helped to usher in a linguistic turn in Sports Studies and further demonstrates her commitment to interdisciplinarity. This panel discusses Dr. Birrell’s scholarly contributions, impact on the field, and the need to critically examine and expand upon the current state of Sports Studies scholarship.

Participants:
Mary G. McDonald
Theresa Walton-Fisette
Jane Stangl
Yu-Kuei Sun
Marta Mack-Washington

Thursday November 7, 2019 12:35pm - 1:35pm EST
Spotswood Arms

1:30pm EST

Conference Registration
Thursday November 7, 2019 1:30pm - 4:00pm EST
Cottage Row

1:45pm EST

Plenary Sessions - Decolonizing Sport Sociology is not a “Metaphor”: Decentering Colonialism, Unsettling Whiteness, & Indigenizing Sport Sociology
This panel considers Tuck and Yang’s (2012) seminal paper “Decolonization is not a Metaphor” as a starting point for our conversation on how to critique and explore ways to decolonize sport sociology using Indigenous perspectives and understandings. As Tuck and Yang (2012) contend, that to adopt a decolonizing discourse without understanding how to decenter settler perspectives that may well be incommensurable with decolonization, achieves very little in the repatriation of Indigenous lands and ways of living | rather, it is not a metaphor for other things we want to do or improve on, but a sovereign act of reclaiming spaces that are often devoid and/or resistant to Indigenous ways of knowing and becoming. In the same breath, unsettling white settler dominance is a never-ending struggle of critically examining how new forms of colonization seek to maintain the status quo, and why a decolonizing agenda is deeply necessary.

Within this conversation the following questions emerge as on-going ‘sites of struggle’, and include:

Presenters:
Dr. Paul Whitinui
Dr. Tricia McGuire-Adams
Dr. Dan Henhawk
Waneek Horn-Miller
1. What new forms of colonization have helped to reinforce colonial/modernist power (social norms) in sport sociology?
2. What kinds of examples continue to reinforce racialized stereotypes of otherness, and in particularly, continue to (mis)represent Indigenous peoples as less than, or made to feel inferior, and |
3. What intersubjectivities can we collectively consider that would bring about a less divisive or hostile understanding about Indigenous peoples’ ways of knowing within sport sociology discourse(s)?

Finally, we aim to move the conversation forward by sharing everyday acts of Indigenous resurgence and renewal to reduce settler harm and to grow Indigenous alliances in sport sociology that are ethically informed, culturally inclusive, and morally astute. This and more, will be shared in concert with the audience’s own experiences.

Thursday November 7, 2019 1:45pm - 3:00pm EST
Peacock Ballroom

3:10pm EST

Keynote Address Amanda Blackhorse & Film Screening More Than A Word (John Little, 2017)
Amanda Blackhorse is a psychiatric social worker on the Navajo Reservation and member of the Navajo people who is known for her work as an activist on the Washington Redskins name controversy. She is the lead plaintiff in Blackhorse v. Pro-Football, Inc. (2013)

More Than A Word (John Little, 2017) analyzes the Washington football team and their use of the derogatory term R*dskins. Using interviews from both those in favor of changing the name and those against, More Than A Word presents a deeper analysis of the many issues surrounding the Washington team name. The documentary also examines the history of Native American cultural appropriation.

Thursday November 7, 2019 3:10pm - 5:10pm EST
Peacock Ballroom

5:20pm EST

Animals and Sport
This session explore the connection between interspecies relationships and sport. We invite presentations that draw on a range of perspectives from studies of sport, interspecies relationships, and animal advocacy that recognize and explore the involvement of animals in sport. This session explores the social processes in the production of knowledge surrounding the role of humans and non-humans in sport, recreation and physical activity. The session seeks to explore the intersection between interspecies sport and power relations along the lines of indigeneity, race, class, sexuality, ability and other power relations

Presenters:
Lovisa Broms
Susanna Hedenborg
Emma Conway & James Gillett

Thursday November 7, 2019 5:20pm - 6:20pm EST
Avamere

5:20pm EST

Being A Good Ally at NASSS
Part of the decolonizing project is creating new or expanding existing institutional pathways in NASSS and sport sociology for Indigenous scholars, scholars of color, and other minoritized scholars. A key means to accomplishing that is white allies respectfully working with Indigenous scholars, scholars of color, and other minoritized scholars to collaboratively create institutional spaces where everyone is recognized and included. This workshop will define what it means to be a good ally, or people willing to go beyond nice words to do the necessary work and take the necessary risks.

Facilitators:
Jay Coakley
Cheryl Cooky
Faye L. Wachs

Thursday November 7, 2019 5:20pm - 6:20pm EST
Princess Anne

5:20pm EST

Decolonizing Paul Robeson: Institutional Rejection, Embrace, and Eventual Celebration
In 2017, Paul Robeson’s granddaughter noted “It wasn’t a Jim Crow campus because there weren’t any other people to Jim Crow…But it was a racist environment.” In 1919, son of a Lenape mother and father born into slavery, Robeson graduated Rutgers College valedictorian. He graduated Columbia Law in 1922, while also playing professional football. His passport was denied because he was sympathetic to Russia and the colonized working class. In 1956, during the House on Un-American Activities Committee hearings, Robeson commented, “You are the Un-Americans, and You Ought to be Ashamed of Yourselves.” In 1958, in Kent vs. Dulles, the US Supreme Court restored his travel. In 2019, Rutgers dedicated The Paul Robeson Plaza for his Centennial Celebration and properly acknowledged his legacy. Panelists will attempt to reconcile the multiple institutional contradictions that oppressed and celebrates the fierce voice of this towering renaissance athlete, scholar, performer, activist and global citizen.

Participants:
Mark S. Schuster
Billy Hawkins
Sarah Fields

Thursday November 7, 2019 5:20pm - 6:20pm EST
Albemarle Hall

5:20pm EST

Finishing a Dissertation
It is often said that “a good dissertation is a done dissertation” but how do you pick a topic and get it done? Intended audience: Graduate students

Facilitators:
Letisha Brown
Guy Harrison
Anna Baeth
Lauren C. Anderson

Thursday November 7, 2019 5:20pm - 6:20pm EST
Peacock C

5:20pm EST

Indigenous Mascots, Names, and Identity Issues
The use of Indigenous names and symbols by sports teams as mascots and names has been demonstrated in social science research to be harmful to Indigenous communities, and especially youth. As a result, NASSS (amongst other academic organizations) passed the Native American Imagery Resolution in 2005 that called for the “discontinuation of Aboriginal/Native American symbols, names, imagery, culture and personas in sport and upon sports teams and educational institutions”. This session will present current research on the use of Indigenous imagery, names, and symbols by sport and educational institutions; Indigenous efforts to resist and end that usage; and teaching about living Indigenous peoples in their rich variety of cultures in North America and beyond that counters stereotypical imagery.

Presenters:
Erin Whiteside & Natalie Welch
Matthew Hodler & Callie Maddox
Estee Fresco

Thursday November 7, 2019 5:20pm - 6:20pm EST
Peacock B

5:20pm EST

Science, technology, and sport I
This session invites papers that critically examine intersections of science, technology, and sport. While open to a variety of academic perspectives, we especially welcome papers that engage with science and technology studies or digital humanities approaches. Aligned with this year’s conference theme, we also encourage submissions exploring science, technology, and sport intersections through anti-oppressive research practice and indigenous ways of knowing. Potential topics include but are not limited to: decolonizing practices in sport science and technology; sport technologies and technologies of the active body; injury, risk, and sport medicine; doping, drugs, and bioethics; sports technologies and (dis)ability, gender, race, class, and sexuality; sport science labs and scientific practices; sport science and technologies in/as media; digital, immersive, or virtual realities in sports; and, sustainability and sport.

Presenters:
Tori Thompson & Shannon Jette
Jesse Couture
Katelyn Esmonde

Thursday November 7, 2019 5:20pm - 6:20pm EST
Peacock A

5:20pm EST

The Spectacle of the Athletic Body II
A half-century ago, theorist Guy Debord (1967) identified the “spectacle,” his term for commodified imagery, as pervasive in contemporary life. Drawing on this concept’s influential legacy, this panel turns to the athletic body as a central piece of social spectacle. A focus on the body enables analysis of how the material (flesh, blood, bone, etc.) is transformed into mediated commodity, how the “real” is made “hyperreal.” While this spectacularization is amplified in the age of digital/social media, contributors are also encouraged to examine historical representations of the athletic body. Following the panel’s critical focus on articulations of power and identity, contributors may address how mediation has been intertwined with colonization, particularly of those athletes whose bodies reflect marginalized identities.

Presenters:
Brandon Wallace & David Andrews
Anna Posbergh & David Andrews
Steve Marston

Thursday November 7, 2019 5:20pm - 6:20pm EST
Spotswood Arms

5:20pm EST

¡Recalmando Nuestros Raíces! (Reclaiming Our Roots!) Decolonization Projects in LatinX Sporting Communities
From the European “discovery” of the New World to the current global economic system, América Latina is situated within multiple colonial projects and is a site of complex racial and ethnic dynamics. Though much has been written on those histories, most research on race and ethnicity within the sports studies field has been fixated on the black and white racial binary. While these studies have been instructive, they continue to manifest projects of racial imperialism and settler colonialism by excluding the Latinx diaspora. Though often overlooked by scholars, sport has played a significant role for those with ties to Latin America, beginning with our indigenous ancestors, to the integration of Latinx athletes in modern sports, to the Latinization of professional sports. This session, partially entitled ¡Reclamando Nuestros Raíces! (Reclaiming Our Roots!), challenges sport scholars to expand anti-oppressive and anti-racist scholarship in new directions by drawing attention to the experiences, challenges and issues of the Latinx diaspora. The session will include research that critically examines Latinx populations and traditions in both North American and International sporting cultures with the broad goal of “decolonizing minds, and indigenizing hearts.”

Presenters:
Demetrius Pearson
Javier Wallace
A. Jaime Morales Jr.

Thursday November 7, 2019 5:20pm - 6:20pm EST
Courtney Terrace

6:45pm EST

NASSSS Goes to the Movies & Director Q&A – The Radicals (2018)
The Radicals (2018) is a documentary film that follows four snowboarders and surfers driven to become social and environmental stewards through their connection with the environments in which they play. By enjoying and appreciating their natural surroundings, these awakened athletes introduce us to some of the worlds most dedicated activists and game-changing wilderness initiatives that can actually change the world.

Thursday November 7, 2019 6:45pm - 8:45pm EST
Peacock Ballroom
 
Friday, November 8
 

7:00am EST

SSJ Board Meeting & Breakfast
Friday November 8, 2019 7:00am - 8:00am EST
Restaurant

7:30am EST

Conference Registration
Friday November 8, 2019 7:30am - 9:30am EST
Cottage Row

8:00am EST

Decolonizing ‘sport’ and ‘development’ in sport-for-development and peace II
In the field of sport-for-development and peace (SDP), decolonizing approaches have been both advocated and employed for the purposes of scholarly investigation and practice (Darnell & Hayhurst, 2011; Oxford, 2019). This session seeks to build on these discussions relating to decolonization and to advance theoretical, conceptual, methodological, and practical insights into how SDP is researched and conducted. In line with the conference theme, we invite papers that engage with decolonial approaches in order to question the dominant meanings of ‘sport’, ‘development’, and the growing ‘SDP’ movement/industry/institution, particularly through Indigenous and marginalized perspectives. Questions we hope to explore include both substantive and methodological concerns, such as: How may research in local contexts, that adopts a decolonial approach, inform the international field of SDP? What are some of the complications, contradictions, and concerns that may arise through adopting decolonial approaches to research and SDP? All paper presentations that revolve around such questions and others related to SDP and the conference theme are invited.

Presenters:
Catherine Houston
Sarah Oxford & Ramon Spaaij
Jon Welty Peachey, Nico Schulenkorf, Patrick Hill

Friday November 8, 2019 8:00am - 9:15am EST
Avamere

8:00am EST

Gendered Discourses in Sport
Presenters:
Amber Wiest
Laura Chase
Bronwyn Corrigan & Dr. Laura Misener
Kasie Murphy

Friday November 8, 2019 8:00am - 9:15am EST
Courtney Terrace

8:00am EST

HBCU Research in Physical Activity, Sport, and Athletics I
Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) are described by the Higher Education Act of 1965 as, “…any historically black college or university that was established prior to 1964, whose principal mission was, and is, the education of black Americans, and that is accredited by a nationally recognized accrediting agency or association determined by the Secretary [of Education]…” Currently, there are 101 HBCUs that offer doctoral, masters, and undergraduate degrees. However, the perceptions of HBCUs and resulting experiences in sport, education, and beyond are often undervalued or misrepresented. Thus, the purpose of this roundtable discussion session is to examine the state of HBCUs (to include successes and challenges) for faculty and students through the relevance of sport.

Presenters:
Brigitte Burpo
Geremy Cheeks
Andrew Dix
Jasmine Hamilton & Kella'e Marshall

Friday November 8, 2019 8:00am - 9:15am EST
Peacock B

8:00am EST

Sexuality, Gender, and Sport/Leisure
Presenters:
Mustafa Karacam
Bethany Geckle
Daniel Eisenkraft Klein & Simon Darnell
William Bridel

Friday November 8, 2019 8:00am - 9:15am EST
Princess Anne

8:00am EST

Socio-Cultural, Economic, Ethical Issues Impacting the Future of College Athletics I
In 1929, the Carnegie Foundation issued a report detailing the major issues affecting college athletics. A number of the issues identified in the 1929 report still impact college athletics today. Issues associated with college athletics in 2019 include commercialization and the athletic arms race, recruiting violations, academic integrity problems, exploitation of minority athletes, a win at all costs attitude, unionization and fair compensation for athletes, Title IX and gender equity, college player violence and drug use, escalating coaching salaries, illegal behavior by coaches, sexual assault by athletes, athlete graduation rates, spiraling expenditures of college athletics, influence of television and the media, and the realignment of conferences. The purpose of this session is to explore issues that impact the future of college athletics from socio-cultural, economic, and ethical perspectives with the hope of shedding additional light on these issues and providing suggestions for their possible resolution in the future.

Presenters:
Dr. Rick Eckstein
Dr. Karla Jones & Dr. Rennae Williams Stowe
Young Ho Kim & Sang Uk Joo
Ajhanai Newton

Friday November 8, 2019 8:00am - 9:15am EST
Peacock A

8:00am EST

Sport & Transnationalism – Global Flows of Sporting Labor
Presenters:
Doo Jae Park & Na Ri Shin
Cengiz Yakut, James Bean, & Morrin Kevin
Jepkorir Rose Chepyator-Thomson & Chenelle K. Goyen
Sehwan Kim & Jepkorir Rose Chepyator-Thomson
Katja Sonkeng, Jepkorir-Rose Chepyator-Thomson

Friday November 8, 2019 8:00am - 9:15am EST
Albemarle Hall

8:00am EST

Sport and Decolonization
Presenters:
Carly Adams & Dr. Darren Aoki
Janice Forsyth & Alexandra Giancarlo
Alexandra Giancarlo & Janice Forsyth
Victoria Paraschak

Friday November 8, 2019 8:00am - 9:15am EST
Peacock C

8:00am EST

Stress, Coping, and Social Support in North American Sport I
Despite ample evidence of the salutary effects of sports participation, research suggests athletes participating in elite-level sport are at risk of suffering from a host of adverse mental health consequences as a result of stressors associated with competitive athletics including but not limited to power, control, and oppression. Furthermore, scholarship suggests that sports participants may cope with stressors in unhealthy or ineffective ways (e.g., through substance use or abuse, internalization, or denial). The purpose of this session is to explore new and innovative research on the stress experiences associated with sport, and on the sources of and barriers to effective coping and social support processes found among sport participants, with the overall goal of identifying evidence-based intervention strategies to effectively reduce sport-related strain and associated mental health consequences. Submissions related to this year’s conference theme of decolonial praxis are particularly encouraged, though all stress- and coping-related submissions are welcomed.

Presenters:
Victor Kidd, Chris Corr, Richard Southall, Richard Hart
Jeongwon Choi, Daewon Yoon & Allison Smith
Krisy Mahome
Sarah J. Hatteberg

Friday November 8, 2019 8:00am - 9:15am EST
Spotswood Arms

8:00am EST

Exhibits
Friday November 8, 2019 8:00am - 5:30pm EST
Prefunction Area

9:15am EST

Student Poster Presentations
Graduate and undergraduate sport scholars will share their research in a casual and convivial space. This is an important opportunity to engage with the future leaders of our field. This is not only a great opportunity to learn about cutting-edge research, it is an incredible community building and professional socializing experience.

Presenters:
Nicole A. Deweyert, Sofiya L. Stumpos & Stavros Triantafyllidias
Oadiah Gassett
Connor MacDonald
Caleb Gwaltney
Hongxin Li, Nicole Robitaille & Cathy van Ingen
Kathleen McCarty
Jane Theriault-Norman
Shushan Dai

Friday November 8, 2019 9:15am - 9:30am EST
Prefunction Area

9:30am EST

Presidential Address: Akilah Carter-Franscique
Friday November 8, 2019 9:30am - 10:45am EST
Peacock Ballroom

10:45am EST

Student Poster Presentations
Graduate and undergraduate sport scholars will share their research in a casual and convivial space. This is an important opportunity to engage with the future leaders of our field. This is not only a great opportunity to learn about cutting-edge research, it is an incredible community building and professional socializing experience.

Presenters:
Nicole A. Deweyert, Sofiya L. Stumpos & Stavros Triantafyllidias
Oadiah Gassett
Connor MacDonald
Caleb Gwaltney
Hongxin Li, Nicole Robitaille & Cathy van Ingen
Kathleen McCarty
Jane Theriault-Norman
Shushan Dai

Friday November 8, 2019 10:45am - 11:00am EST
Prefunction Area

11:00am EST

Decolonizing success, progressive consumerism and “Wokeness” in Sport-Media & State-Sanctioned Sporting Cultures
Presenters:
Toni Bruce
Timothy Mirabito, Stephen Mosher & Danielle Pluchinsky
Sherry Mason, Sung Ahn, & Jeffrey Montez de Oca
Faye Wachs, Beverly Lotter& Cheryl Cooky

Friday November 8, 2019 11:00am - 12:15pm EST
Spotswood Arms

11:00am EST

Politics and Protest II
Presenters:
Kenneth Chaplin
Kyle Green & Alex Mannings
Pierre Rodgers & Felecia Jordan

Friday November 8, 2019 11:00am - 12:15pm EST
Peacock A

11:00am EST

Sport and development
Presenters:
Na Ri Shin, Doo Jae Park, Jon Welty Peachey
Wonock Chung & Seung-Hye Shin
Evan Davis & Chris Knoester
Eric Stone

Friday November 8, 2019 11:00am - 12:15pm EST
Avamere

11:00am EST

Sport and Intersectionality
Presenters:
Andrea Bingham & Beau Houston
Janelle Joseph
Jason Laurendeau & Tiffany Higham
Stephen Shin

Friday November 8, 2019 11:00am - 12:15pm EST
Peacock B

11:00am EST

Sport and Nation
Presenters:
Kwangho Park, G. Douglas Davis, Minkil Kim & Gi-Yong Koo
Jorion Tucker
Danyel Reiche
Bridgette Desjardins
Robert J. Lake
Oliver J. C. Rick & Longxi Li

Friday November 8, 2019 11:00am - 12:15pm EST
Courtney Terrace

11:00am EST

Sport and Religion
Historically, sport has been used to further the agenda of colonial projects. Many of these projects occurred under the auspices and direction of religious organizations: for example, Christianity and athletics at the Carlisle Indian Industrial School, or the “reformative” impulses of the YMCA’s work with immigrant populations in the US, as well as its missionary activity abroad. More recently, work in the area of sport for development and peace has been implicated, as sport is often a tool for religious NGO’s and mission organizations. Thus, the purpose of this panel is to offer a forum for scholarship on religion and sport, with particular attention to notions of colonialism, broadly interpreted. General work on sport and religion will be considered, but preference will be given to presentations that tie in to the conference theme. Topics might include: sport, mission work, and colonialism; religion, colonialism, and sport for development and peace; the “colonial” shape of religion and sport scholarship generally; or issues of power and representation for religious sport organizations (e.g., Global Sports Chaplaincy).

Presenters:
Andrew Meyer
Danielle Lavoie
Steven Waller
Robin Kietlinski
Umer Hussain & George Cunningham

Friday November 8, 2019 11:00am - 12:15pm EST
Albemarle Hall

11:00am EST

Sport and settler-decolonization I
Indigenous ally scholarship in sport shares an engagement with critical social justice and anti-oppression approaches that can often enact and obscure systemic violence. Emerging settler learning, engagement and solidarities are leading scholars from multiple disciplines to turn to settler colonial theory in search of new conceptual tools to address decolonization. This session interrogates what happens when settler and Indigenous scholars seek to deconstruct and transform the settler colonial logic of systems in sport research. What are we learning and unlearning through these approaches? How does action occur and how do we become engaged scholars? What opportunities and possibilities emerge? What does such action look like? How do we envisage decolonial futures? How do we avoid being complicit in a violent history of benevolence, for example, in sport for development? What challenges, complexities and barriers are faced? Why and how do we still resist using settler colonial theory in sport research?

Presenters:
Audrey Giles, Rob Millington, Nicolien van Luijk, Lyndsay Hayhurst, Steven Rynne, Steven Latino
Anna Baeth
Tyler Carson
Chen Chen

Friday November 8, 2019 11:00am - 12:15pm EST
Peacock C

11:00am EST

Sport-Media at the Crossroads of Non-Normative Sports, Athletic Identity, and the Disruption of Professional Sports Broadcasting & Journalism
Presenters:
Joshua Woods
Guilherme Reis Nothen
Brett Pardy
Nicholas Buzzelli, Patrick Gentile, & Andrew Billings

Friday November 8, 2019 11:00am - 12:15pm EST
Princess Anne

12:15pm EST

Take A Student to Lunch
This annual tradition encourages faculty and/or professional members of NASSS to “Take a Student to Lunch” as an opportunity to promote interaction between faculty members and graduate (or undergraduate) students.

Friday November 8, 2019 12:15pm - 1:45pm EST
Peacock C

1:45pm EST

BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, People of Color) Caucus
Historically, academic conferences in “North America” have been predominantly white spaces with limited opportunity for BIPOC intervention. In an effort to intervene on this dynamic, one strategy adopted by conference and community organizers elsewhere is to create BIPOC-only spaces to allow for the gathering of BIPOC community members for connecting and processing. The creation of such BIPOC-only space, however, has yet to take roots at NASSS. And this will hopefully change at the 2019 NASSS conference. The BIPOC Caucus will serve as an organizing space for those who self-identify as Black, Indigenous, and/or people of color to build caring and responsible relationships, strong coalitions, leadership capacity, and power at NASSS. The caucus will be facilitated by BIPOC scholars and will be a casual opportunity for BIPOC conference participants, especially junior scholars and graduate students, to meet one another and check in mid-conference. We will hold space for a range of discussions, but participants should feel free to bring any needs, ideas, feelings, or frustrations to this BIPOC-only space.

Presenters:
Roc (Monica) Rochon
Algerian Hart
Tricia McGuire-Adams
Kristi Oshiro
F. Michelle Richardson
Courtney Szto
Paul Whitinui
Jorge Moraga

Friday November 8, 2019 1:45pm - 3:00pm EST
Albemarle Hall

1:45pm EST

Colonial Influences on Racial and Athletic Identity in Black Athletes
Hawkins (2010) conceptualized the condition of the African American student-athlete as a consequence of “internal colonialism.” These colonial influences are persistent in the current era though manifested in different ways. The plight of these athletes have been examined previously via stereotyping, media influences, role modeling and other theoretical and conceptual lenses. Here we posit an examination of the juncture of racial and athletic identity in African American student-athletes through research conducted by four researchers from the University of Texas at Austin.

Presenters:
Brandon J. Crooms
Daniel J. Thomas
Devin Walker
Javier Wallace

Friday November 8, 2019 1:45pm - 3:00pm EST
Spotswood Arms

1:45pm EST

Negotiating Gender through Sport
Presenters:
Adam Berg
Vitor Hugo Marani
Lars Dzikus
Callie Maddox
Jaime DeLuca & Jacob Bustad

Friday November 8, 2019 1:45pm - 3:00pm EST
Courtney Terrace

1:45pm EST

New Directions in Disability Sport Scholarship I
Despite the recent burgeoning interest into disability sport, scholarship in this field is often accused of reinforcing ableist attitudes, treating disability as a homogenous construct, and failing to adequately acknowledge intersections of disability alongside other dimensions of embodied identity (e.g. race/ethnicity, gender, sexuality, age and class). Furthermore, in spite of a handful of offerings, empirical research continues to predominantly attend to athletes with more ‘normative’ impairments and addresses Paralympic or elite sport in preference of recreational or non-elite competition. These shortcomings are indicative of our collective failure to engage with contemporary, innovative theoretical and methodological frameworks. Therefore, in this session we invite papers that challenge the dominant approaches in disability sport scholarship and provide new empirical, theoretical and methodological directions. We particularly welcome papers which engage with anti-oppressive, anti-ableist, and decolonializing approaches as we seek to expand the limited critical scholarship in this emerging field.

Presenters:
Ben Powis
Roxy O’Rourke
Amanda Schweinbenz
James Brighton & Andrew Sparkes

Friday November 8, 2019 1:45pm - 3:00pm EST
Princess Anne

1:45pm EST

Sport and Health – Empirical and Theoretical Insights
Presenters:
Meungguk Park, Emeka Anaza & Heejine Shin
Pirkko Markula
Dominic Malcolm

Friday November 8, 2019 1:45pm - 3:00pm EST
Peacock C

1:45pm EST

Sport Management and the (Public) Sociology of Sport I
Many sociology of sport scholars find themselves working in sport management academic programs. Indeed, many scholars may attend conferences and publish in journals from the fields of both sport management and sociology of sport. In these ways, some meaningful overlap exists between the two fields. Such connections between the fields are perhaps particularly relevant given recent attention to public sociology of sport. In some ways, activities such as teaching sport management students and engaging with sport management practitioners may be conceptualized as "doing" public sociology of sport. Ultimately, this session invites submissions that highlight or interrogate the potential (dis)connections between sport management and sociology of sport.

Presenters:
Megan Chawansky
Joshua Pate, David Shonk & Timothy Mirabito
Carter Rockhill, Chris Knoester & Brian Turner
Robert Turick & Trevor Bopp

Friday November 8, 2019 1:45pm - 3:00pm EST
Peacock A

1:45pm EST

Sport Participation and Family I
Participation in sports — youth programs, adult hobbies, elite competitions, and more — can become an obsession. Athletes or sport enthusiasts may interpret their single-minded pursuit as the key to success, dedication, or discipline, and this attitude may be supported by teammates, coaches, parents, fans, partners, and families, but it can ultimately have a negative effect on the athlete and others, leaving them open to some level of exploitation or oppression. For example, when a professional/elite athlete’s career dominates a marriage or domestic partnership, these career-dominated relationships can require a partner to make costly sacrifices as they support the athlete’s success. Conversely, athletes can become overly fixated on certain outcomes that negatively affect their mental and emotional health and lead to exploitation through any number of channels. This session explores the myriad ramifications of sport obsession and how it leads to oppression and exploitation of athletes and those they care about.

Presenters:
Chris Knoester & Victoria Fields
Yilun Zhou
Madison Danford
Jessica Siegele, Natalie Welch, & Robin Hardin

Friday November 8, 2019 1:45pm - 3:00pm EST
Peacock B

1:45pm EST

Sport, the environment and sustainable development I
In recent years, sport has been increasingly cast as an agent of sustainable development, with organizations like the UN positioning sport as a catalyst to poverty alleviation, gender equality, good health, and as a means to “implement positive responses to climate challenges.” Indeed, as the sport for development (SFD) sector continues to grow, sport’s contribution to sustainable development has become more pressing as “developing” polities are more likely to see the effects of climate change before and more profoundly than “developed” ones. However, the connections between SFD and sustainability have been subject to critique, particularly for the dubious environmental record of the sport industry, and for the fact that “sustainability” is itself a contested term, operating as a “strategically deployable shifter” often detached from any environmental meaning. This session thus aims to explore the intersections between sport, the environment and development, with particular attention paid to issues of sustainability, decolonization, and land rights.

Presenters:
Rob Millington, Simon Darnell, & Tavis Smith
Devra Waldman
Kyoung-yim Kim

Friday November 8, 2019 1:45pm - 3:00pm EST
Avamere

3:10pm EST

Examining Athlete Development Across the Sporting Landscape II
Sport is a billion-dollar industry and often the business side of sport seems to overshadow the athlete as a person. This session will explore a variety of issues that exist surrounding athlete development. Athlete development sees the athlete as a whole person and focuses on both the athletic and personal development of the athlete. This session invites papers that examine the athlete development process and the athlete experience. How can we use this research to create better experiences for the athlete? Topics presented in this session may include, but are not limited to, the sociological aspects of athlete development, athletic identify, transitions, academic support, social justice and activism, athlete wellbeing, character and leadership development, and career development. Papers submitted to this session should emphasize the athlete over profits and address implications for practitioners.

Presenters:
Natalie Welch, Allison Smith, Robin Hardin
Tamara Moten & Marques Dexter
James Tompsett

Friday November 8, 2019 3:10pm - 4:25pm EST
Courtney Terrace

3:10pm EST

Media, Sport, and Gender
Presenters:
Aage Radmann
Stacey Pope
Roc (Monica) Rochon
Barbara Ravel & Gina S. Comeau
Gretchen Peterson, Caroline Reilly, and Michael Topping

Friday November 8, 2019 3:10pm - 4:25pm EST
Princess Anne

3:10pm EST

Sport and Health – Mental Health
Presenters:
Hannah Plummer
Ted Butryn, Jay Johnson & Matthew Masucci
Kerry McGannon & Jenny McMahon
Kyle Bunds

Friday November 8, 2019 3:10pm - 4:25pm EST
Peacock B

3:10pm EST

Sport and settler-decolonization II
Indigenous ally scholarship in sport shares an engagement with critical social justice and anti-oppression approaches that can often enact and obscure systemic violence. Emerging settler learning, engagement and solidarities are leading scholars from multiple disciplines to turn to settler colonial theory in search of new conceptual tools to address decolonization. This session interrogates what happens when settler and Indigenous scholars seek to deconstruct and transform the settler colonial logic of systems in sport research. What are we learning and unlearning through these approaches? How does action occur and how do we become engaged scholars? What opportunities and possibilities emerge? What does such action look like? How do we envisage decolonial futures? How do we avoid being complicit in a violent history of benevolence, for example, in sport for development? What challenges, complexities and barriers are faced? Why and how do we still resist using settler colonial theory in sport research?

Presenters:
Stephen Sheps
Alexandra Arellano & Joseph Friis

Friday November 8, 2019 3:10pm - 4:25pm EST
Peacock A

3:10pm EST

Sport and Youth
Presenters:
Trevor Bopp & Joshua Vadeboncoeur
Curtis Fogel & Daniel Sailofsky
Ashley Ryder, Richard Hsiao, Dr. Brian Turner, Leeann Lower-Hoppe, Kristi L. Storti & Madeline Paternostro Bayles
Adriene Davis & Rachel Allison
Jen McGovern

Friday November 8, 2019 3:10pm - 4:25pm EST
Peacock C

3:10pm EST

Sport in Today’s Urban Environment
In today's urban environment, there are more ways than there have ever been for individuals to participate in organized sport and recreation. While there have unarguably been marginalized populations harmed by the expansion of urban sport and recreational opportunities (namely those that cannot afford to participate in the increasingly popular for-profit leagues), many individuals, including NASSS researchers, are participating at levels never seen in the past. This session looks at benefits beyond the immediate sense of organized recreational programming for all populations, and add to the growing body of research aimed at how cities are continuing to find new ways to use sport and recreation to combat urban community issues.

Presenters:
Rodney Carveth
Teresa Hill
Jessica Monu
Tyler Sigmon
Justin Stamer
Jessica Webb

Friday November 8, 2019 3:10pm - 4:25pm EST
Albemarle Hall

3:10pm EST

Sport, the environment and sustainable development II
In recent years, sport has been increasingly cast as an agent of sustainable development, with organizations like the UN positioning sport as a catalyst to poverty alleviation, gender equality, good health, and as a means to “implement positive responses to climate challenges.” Indeed, as the sport for development (SFD) sector continues to grow, sport’s contribution to sustainable development has become more pressing as “developing” polities are more likely to see the effects of climate change before and more profoundly than “developed” ones. However, the connections between SFD and sustainability have been subject to critique, particularly for the dubious environmental record of the sport industry, and for the fact that “sustainability” is itself a contested term, operating as a “strategically deployable shifter” often detached from any environmental meaning. This session thus aims to explore the intersections between sport, the environment and development, with particular attention paid to issues of sustainability, decolonization, and land rights.

Presenters:
Courtney Szto & Jennifer Wigglesworth
Mary Louise Adams
Dain TePoel
Samantha King & Gavin Weedon

Friday November 8, 2019 3:10pm - 4:25pm EST
Spotswood Arms

3:10pm EST

Teaching the Sociology of Sport: Pedagogies, Assignments, and Issues I
The scholarship of teaching and learning is an important part of any academic conference. This session invites participants to share their practical strategies and/or concerns for effective teaching and learning in the sociology of sport. In keeping with the conference theme, we hope that at least some of the presentations will demonstrate methods for designing classroom spaces and assignments that seek to decolonize sport sociology.

Presenters:
Phil Hatlem
Shannon Jette & Patrick Crowley
Jessica Chin
Alexandra Fairchild & Nicolle Skoien

Friday November 8, 2019 3:10pm - 4:25pm EST
Avamere

4:35pm EST

Sport and Health – Health, Spaces/Places and Communities
Presenters:
Janita Frantsi
Kaitlin Perciak
Tiesha Martin
Eklou Amendah & Kostas Karadakis

Friday November 8, 2019 4:35pm - 5:35pm EST
Peacock A

4:35pm EST

Sport Management and the (Public) Sociology of Sport II
Many sociology of sport scholars find themselves working in sport management academic programs. Indeed, many scholars may attend conferences and publish in journals from the fields of both sport management and sociology of sport. In these ways, some meaningful overlap exists between the two fields. Such connections between the fields are perhaps particularly relevant given recent attention to public sociology of sport. In some ways, activities such as teaching sport management students and engaging with sport management practitioners may be conceptualized as "doing" public sociology of sport. Ultimately, this session invites submissions that highlight or interrogate the potential (dis)connections between sport management and sociology of sport.

Presenters:
Simon Barrick
Danielle Coombs & Anne Osborne
Joshua Vadeboncoeur & Trevor Bopp

Friday November 8, 2019 4:35pm - 5:35pm EST
Peacock C

4:35pm EST

Sport Participation and Family II
Participation in sports — youth programs, adult hobbies, elite competitions, and more — can become an obsession. Athletes or sport enthusiasts may interpret their single-minded pursuit as the key to success, dedication, or discipline, and this attitude may be supported by teammates, coaches, parents, fans, partners, and families, but it can ultimately have a negative effect on the athlete and others, leaving them open to some level of exploitation or oppression. For example, when a professional/elite athlete’s career dominates a marriage or domestic partnership, these career-dominated relationships can require a partner to make costly sacrifices as they support the athlete’s success. Conversely, athletes can become overly fixated on certain outcomes that negatively affect their mental and emotional health and lead to exploitation through any number of channels. This session explores the myriad ramifications of sport obsession and how it leads to oppression and exploitation of athletes and those they care about.

Presenters:
Adeoye Adeyemo
Jeff Graham & Natalie Welch
Steven Ortiz

Friday November 8, 2019 4:35pm - 5:35pm EST
Peacock B

4:35pm EST

The Making of Surfing: Appropriation, Coloniality, and Revisionism
Surfing as lifestyle, competitive sport, counter-culture, art, religion is a complex global practice shaped not only by Indigenous cultures but also by a history of colonization—spatial, cultural, and intellectual. Surfing constitutes one of the examples in which colonialism generated cultural appropriation and gave settlers—North Americans and Europeans—the power to rewrite surfing’s history and to gain linguistic, economic, cultural, political, ideological, and scholarly monopolies. The postcolonial culture of sport scholarship compels us to question the consensual myths, symbols, and representations of sport cultures. This session asks how can new fields of study, such as surf studies, deconstruct rooted histories built through colonial media and literature in order for sport scholarship to become a space of encounter, debate, and renewal between indigenous and colonizing institutions. The session ponders on ways to move surf scholars in new anti-oppressive and egalitarian directions in order to inform global sport scholarship.

Presenters:
Lindsay Usher
Nikolaus Dean
Anne Barjolin-Smith

Friday November 8, 2019 4:35pm - 5:35pm EST
Spotswood Arms

4:35pm EST

Title IX and Sport: Forging Pathways to Fight Oppression I
Gender equity remains a critical issue in college and high school athletics. Men were head coaches of 59.8 percent of women’s college teams in 2015-16 (NCAA, 2017). From 2011-2016, interscholastic boys’ participation opportunities increased by over 50,000 and the number of girls’ opportunities grew by over 150,000, yet “current girls” interscholastic participation numbers have never reached the boys pre-Title IX level (NCAA, 2017). Therefore, there is a need to deconstruct the ways in which power and oppression continue to influence intercollegiate and interscholastic athletic programs. Engagement in scholarship surrounding Title IX may forge pathways in confronting this injustice. Aligning with the conference theme of “decolonizing sport sociology,” this session seeks to highlight Title IX scholarship which sparks critical examination of gender equity in sport and challenges gender-based oppression, power, and marginalization in sports.

Presenters:
Sandra Dufour
Courtney L. Flowers & Erica J. Zonder
Deirdre D. Pierson & Erin Morris

Friday November 8, 2019 4:35pm - 5:35pm EST
Princess Anne

4:35pm EST

Workshop: Research Centers
Research centers dedicated to socio-cultural aspects of sport have become increasingly common in North America and around the world. This workshop features the directors of established sport research centers discussing their experiential knowledge of successfully running a research center. Intended audience: All

Facilitators:
Peter Donnelly
Mary McDonald
MaryJo Kane
Missy Wright

Friday November 8, 2019 4:35pm - 5:35pm EST
Courtney Terrace

5:35pm EST

Student Poster Presentations
Graduate and undergraduate sport scholars will share their research in a casual and convivial space. This is an important opportunity to engage with the future leaders of our field. This is not only a great opportunity to learn about cutting-edge research, it is an incredible community building and professional socializing experience.

Presenters:
Nicole A. Deweyert, Sofiya L. Stumpos & Stavros Triantafyllidias
Oadiah Gassett
Connor MacDonald
Caleb Gwaltney
Hongxin Li, Nicole Robitaille & Cathy van Ingen
Kathleen McCarty
Jane Theriault-Norman
Shushan Dai

Friday November 8, 2019 5:35pm - 5:45pm EST
Prefunction Area

5:45pm EST

NASSS Business Meeting & Awards
Friday November 8, 2019 5:45pm - 7:15pm EST
Peacock Ballroom

7:15pm EST

President’s Reception
Friday November 8, 2019 7:15pm - 8:30pm EST
Prefunction Area
 
Saturday, November 9
 

7:00am EST

NASSS Board Meeting & Breakfast
Saturday November 9, 2019 7:00am - 10:00am EST
Restaurant

7:30am EST

Conference Registration
Saturday November 9, 2019 7:30am - 9:30am EST
Cottage Row

8:00am EST

Author Meets Critic: Kicking Center
This session engages a discussion and critique of Kicking Center: Gender and the selling of women’s professional soccer authored by Rachel Allison [Rutgers University Press, 2018]. An invited panel of experts will offer an overview of key contributions and findings, provide a critical analysis, speak to the merits of the text, and situate the work within the larger body of scholarship on gender, race, class, sexuality and sport. The author will engage with and respond to the panel’s “critics.”

Critics:
Jennifer McGovern
Stacey Pope
Matthew R. Hodler
Alex Manning
Barbara Ravel

Saturday November 9, 2019 8:00am - 9:15am EST
Peacock B

8:00am EST

Examining Athlete Development Across the Sporting Landscape III
Sport is a billion-dollar industry and often the business side of sport seems to overshadow the athlete as a person. This session will explore a variety of issues that exist surrounding athlete development. Athlete development sees the athlete as a whole person and focuses on both the athletic and personal development of the athlete. This session invites papers that examine the athlete development process and the athlete experience. How can we use this research to create better experiences for the athlete? Topics presented in this session may include, but are not limited to, the sociological aspects of athlete development, athletic identify, transitions, academic support, social justice and activism, athlete wellbeing, character and leadership development, and career development. Papers submitted to this session should emphasize the athlete over profits and address implications for practitioners.

Presenters:
Allie Luther
Mimi Nartey & Dan McKegney
Joel Cormier
Amanda L. Paule-Koba, Sarah Stokowski & Chelsea Kaunert

Saturday November 9, 2019 8:00am - 9:15am EST
Peacock C

8:00am EST

New Directions in Disability Sport Scholarship II
Despite the recent burgeoning interest into disability sport, scholarship in this field is often accused of reinforcing ableist attitudes, treating disability as a homogenous construct, and failing to adequately acknowledge intersections of disability alongside other dimensions of embodied identity (e.g. race/ethnicity, gender, sexuality, age and class). Furthermore, in spite of a handful of offerings, empirical research continues to predominantly attend to athletes with more ‘normative’ impairments and addresses Paralympic or elite sport in preference of recreational or non-elite competition. These shortcomings are indicative of our collective failure to engage with contemporary, innovative theoretical and methodological frameworks. Therefore, in this session we invite papers that challenge the dominant approaches in disability sport scholarship and provide new empirical, theoretical and methodological directions. We particularly welcome papers which engage with anti-oppressive, anti-ableist, and decolonializing approaches as we seek to expand the limited critical scholarship in this emerging field.

Presenters:
Robin Hardin, Avery Blankenburg, Jason Scott & Joshua R Pate
Joseph O'Rourke, Tim Konoval & Andrea Bundon
Krystn Orr
Michael Cottingham, John Paul Petrola & Don Lee, Jake Ledesma & Christian Paul Venturillo

Saturday November 9, 2019 8:00am - 9:15am EST
Peacock A

8:00am EST

Roadblocks and Social Pressures – The Historical Basketball League and the Decolonization of College Sport
In 2015, on the heels of the O’Bannon ruling, a plan to change the landscape of college sports was born. The Historic Basketball League (HBL) puts college athletes first, pays them, and ensures that they are getting an education that prepares them for life on and off the court. The goal of the HBL is to disrupt the exploitative amateur model and give athletes a fair alternative. Social, economic, and political forces (determined to maintain the status quo) have created a number of challenges/roadblocks, and forced the leagues leadership team to adjust and find alternative avenues in which to operate. This panel discussion, which includes members of the HBL’s leadership team and members of the educational advisory board, will discuss the HBL’s mission, structure, education model, and support services. Additionally, the panel will explain how external social, economic, and political forces have shaped the league through the formational years.

Participants:
Ricky Volante
David West
Keith Sparks
Dr. Emmett Gill
Dr. Joseph Cooper
Dr. Dale Sheptak

Saturday November 9, 2019 8:00am - 9:15am EST
Spotswood Arms

8:00am EST

Sport, the environment and sustainable development III
In recent years, sport has been increasingly cast as an agent of sustainable development, with organizations like the UN positioning sport as a catalyst to poverty alleviation, gender equality, good health, and as a means to “implement positive responses to climate challenges.” Indeed, as the sport for development (SFD) sector continues to grow, sport’s contribution to sustainable development has become more pressing as “developing” polities are more likely to see the effects of climate change before and more profoundly than “developed” ones. However, the connections between SFD and sustainability have been subject to critique, particularly for the dubious environmental record of the sport industry, and for the fact that “sustainability” is itself a contested term, operating as a “strategically deployable shifter” often detached from any environmental meaning. This session thus aims to explore the intersections between sport, the environment and development, with particular attention paid to issues of sustainability, decolonization, and land rights.

Presenters:
Lequez Spearman
Grace Yan, Nicholas Watanabe & Christopher McLeod
Jessica Murfree & Chelsea Police

Saturday November 9, 2019 8:00am - 9:15am EST
Princess Anne

8:00am EST

Teaching the Sociology of Sport: Pedagogies, Assignments, and Issues II
The scholarship of teaching and learning is an important part of any academic conference. This session invites participants to share their practical strategies and/or concerns for effective teaching and learning in the sociology of sport. In keeping with the conference theme, we hope that at least some of the presentations will demonstrate methods for designing classroom spaces and assignments that seek to decolonize sport sociology.

Presenters:
Dawn Norwood & Joyce Olushola
Addie Bracy, Brian Gearity, Bailey Mathis, Erin Murray, & Olivia Oppenheim
Fred Mason
Wib Leonard

Saturday November 9, 2019 8:00am - 9:15am EST
Albemarle Hall

8:00am EST

Workshop: Meet the Editors of Sport Sociology Journals
This workshop provides NASSS members with the opportunity to meet with the editors of leading sport sociology journals to discuss and learn about publishing. Intended audience: Graduate students and junior faculty

Editors:
Michael Giardina, SSJ
Lawrence Wenner, Communication and Sport
Dominic Malcolm, IRSS
CL Cole, JSSI

Saturday November 9, 2019 8:00am - 9:15am EST
Courtney Terrace

8:00am EST

Exhibits
Saturday November 9, 2019 8:00am - 12:00pm EST
Prefunction Area

9:25am EST

Black Activism and Resistance within Racialized Organizations
From John Carlos to Colin Kaepernick, Black athletes have a long tradition of activism within professional sports organizations. The film, High Flying Bird, tells the story of a sports ‘lockout’ and the ways that athletes, agencies, and organizations respond to the lockout. The scripted film provides a useful lens from which viewers are able to visualize inequality, race, and resistance within sports organizations. This film follows a tradition rooted in Critical Race Theory and its use of counter storytelling in illuminating everyday racism. In this panel, panelists will discuss the history of Black activism within racialized organizations such as the one in the film, the exploitation of Black (athletic) labor, and the political economy of these organizations using the film High Flying Bird. Panelists will also explore Black women’s roles within the film as well as examine the ways in which Black women resist and challenge the intersectional domains of oppression within these sports organizations. Moreover, the panelists will discuss the film’s use of the Revolt of the Black Athlete and the role of knowledge production in shaping and reifying larger narratives.

Presenters:
Stephanie Jones
Danielle Koonce
Letisha Brown
Rodrigo Dominguez-Martinez

Saturday November 9, 2019 9:25am - 10:40am EST
Courtney Terrace

9:25am EST

Bodies, Training, and Rationalities
Presenters:
Shaun Edmonds
Hannah Bennett, Christina Gipson, Nancy Malcom & Alexandra Trahan
Christina Gipson
Kristi Allain & Stephanie Dotto

Saturday November 9, 2019 9:25am - 10:40am EST
Albemarle Hall

9:25am EST

Death of the (Sporting) Black Atlantic? The maintenance of global white supremacy
In a recent (2019) interview, acclaimed scholar Paul Gilroy explained that, “for me the dream of The Black Atlantic died with the re-emergence of African-American music at the core of US military and cultural diplomacy. It was finally strangled by the likes of Colin Powell, Condi and the Obamas on one side and Jay-Z, Kanye and Beyoncé on the other. The Black Panther was the last nail in that coffin.” This session, if only indirectly, seeks to explore Gilroy’s assertion that the hope of diasporic anti-racist coalition building has been dashed by nationalist white supremacy and its neoliberal, militaristic, projects—often using black and brown bodies in the process. Where does (global) sport fit into this? Papers can address a range of topics and their intersection(s) with sport, including but not limited to: imperialism/nationalism, white supremacy and anti-black racism, neoliberal capitalism, and patriarchy.

Presenters:
Daniel Burdsey
Munene F. Mwaniki
Inma Naima Zanoguera
Peter Donnelly

Saturday November 9, 2019 9:25am - 10:40am EST
Peacock C

9:25am EST

Embodiment, Intersectionality, and Existence
This session explores research on bodies and the experience of embodiment from an intersectional perspective.

Presenters:
La Larry DeGaris
Laurent Paccaud
Nancy Spencer
Adam Ali

Saturday November 9, 2019 9:25am - 10:40am EST
Peacock B

9:25am EST

Examining Athlete Development Across the Sporting Landscape IV
Sport is a billion-dollar industry and often the business side of sport seems to overshadow the athlete as a person. This session will explore a variety of issues that exist surrounding athlete development. Athlete development sees the athlete as a whole person and focuses on both the athletic and personal development of the athlete. This session invites papers that examine the athlete development process and the athlete experience. How can we use this research to create better experiences for the athlete? Topics presented in this session may include, but are not limited to, the sociological aspects of athlete development, athletic identify, transitions, academic support, social justice and activism, athlete wellbeing, character and leadership development, and career development. Papers submitted to this session should emphasize the athlete over profits and address implications for practitioners.

Presenters:
Sayvon JL Foster & John N. Singer
Emily McCullogh
Shea Brgoch, Chrysostomos Giannoulakis, James Johnson, Dorice Hankemeier & Leeann Lower-Hoppe

Saturday November 9, 2019 9:25am - 10:40am EST
Peacock A

9:25am EST

Sport and Communities
Presenters:
Rachel Allison
Donna Mozaffarian
Wonju Lee, Wonock Chung, & Jon Welty-Peachey
Judy Davidson, Rylan Kafara, & Jay Scherer
Brian Wilson, Jesse Couture & Brad Millington

Saturday November 9, 2019 9:25am - 10:40am EST
Spotswood Arms

9:25am EST

Work Matters: Sport Work and Precarious Realities
In sport, part-time front of house staff for public assembly facilities, including ushers, concessions workers, ticket takers, and security personnel belong to an emerging class of workers, the precariat (Standing, 2012). They find themselves in the same position as millions of disenfranchised workers across the globe who are underemployed or in a position where the prospect of full-time employment is scarce. This reality forces individuals to assemble, what we will refer to as, a portfolio of jobs that offer little to no long-term economic security. This session invites presentations that address the nature of the sport labor market. Questions addressed may include: is the economic model of the sport industry a breeding ground for precarious labor?; what attributes of the sport labor market allow for current forms of precarious labor?; and what are the societal and ethical considerations of using precarious labor in sport.

Presenters:
Max Klein & Joseph Cooper
Jamie Ryan
Alixandra Krahn
Matthew Hawzen, Ryan King-White, & Jacqueline Tannucilli
R. Dale Sheptak, Brian Menaker & Michael Odio

Saturday November 9, 2019 9:25am - 10:40am EST
Princess Anne

9:25am EST

L8 Climate Change Forum
Inspired by the global student climate strikes, this session will provide an informal discussion around climate related issues with emphasis on ways to make NASSS more sustainable and on how we can increase a focus on sustainability in our scholarship.

Presenters (tentative):
Simon C. Darnell, University of Toronto
Chen Chen, University of Alberta
Mary Louise Adams, Queens University
Faye L. Wachs, California State University, Pomona
Courtney Szto, Queens University
Steph McKay, University of Ottawa

Speakers
SD

Simon Darnell

A Researcher from the Start: The limits of participatory methods, University of Toronto
This presentation offers some critical self-reflections gleaned from a participatory study with youth in Toronto. The study, funded by the Ontario government, explored the ways in which young people living in Toronto make sense of sport, and whether/how sport connects to their everyday... Read More →


Saturday November 9, 2019 9:25am - 10:50am EST
Avamere

10:50am EST

Alan Ingham Memorial Lecture: Indigenizing Sports Sociology is a “Verb not a Noun”: De-colonizing Our Way to Reconciliation and Inclusion in the 21stCentury
Following the release of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada’s Calls to Action in 2015, Canada universities, and colleges have felt pressured to indigenize their institutions. As Smith, Tuck and Yang (2018) posit, indigenous and decolonizing perspectives in education (or across disciplines for that matter) have long persisted alongside colonial models of education, yet too often they have been subsumed within the fields of multiculturalism, critical race theory, and progressive education. Indeed, what “indigenization” looks like can vary significantly; with the promise of Indigenous reconciliation and inclusion often left to the imagination of leaders in institutions or organizations who see an opportunity to further extend their reach, influence and/or branding into Indigenous communities from above. Counter to the idea of inclusion, acts of decolonizing often remain elusive with little or no accountability forthcoming concerning the continual loss and struggle to protect our lands, life and/or ways of living.  Adam Gaudry (2018) argues, however, that to achieve ajustNorth American academy employing treaty-based decolonial indigenization and resurgence-based decolonial indigenization – as strategies for policy-making and praxis are deeply necessary in how we move forward together; in this new era of reconciliation and inclusion. The aim of this presentation, therefore, will be to show how decolonizing our way to reconciliation and inclusion in sports sociology for the benefit of all, not only requires Indigenous peoples to be at the forefront of leading this work, it also requires institutions and organizations to prioritise as well as operationalize the appropriate resources, time and funding of decolonizing sports sociology outside of the race-culture-identity-difference binaries, settler fantasies and ambiguities, neoliberal loaded ideologies, and internalised colonialism built on domestic settler idealism. Finally, exploring Indigenizing sports sociology more as a “verb not a noun” is as much about doing the work together, as it is about acknowledging that Indigenous people’s world views, and ways of knowing are just as relevant as they were before the arrival of colonization. This and more will be shared in the presentation.

Speakers
avatar for Paul Whitinui

Paul Whitinui

Associate Professor, The University of Victoria, BC
Dr. Paul Whitinui is an Indigenous Māori scholar from theConfederation of Tribes in the Far North of Aotearoa New Zealand (NgāPuhi, Te Aupōuri, Ngāti Kurī) on his Dad’s side, and a third generation New Zealand Pākehā(French, Irish, Welsh and English) on his Mum’s side... Read More →


Saturday November 9, 2019 10:50am - 12:05pm EST
Peacock Ballroom

12:10pm EST

Four Women: Examining Stereotypes of Women of Color in Sport
In 1966, Nina Simone released Four Women, a song that illuminated four pervasive stereotypes of Black women in the United States. From “Aunt Sarah” to “Saffronia” to “Sweet Thing” to “Peaches”, these stereotypes conveyed the cultural lineage of Black women’s marginality in society. Today these stereotypes continue to prevail in society and in sport through Collins (2000) historical images of the Jezebel to the Angry Black woman. The effects of these negative stereotypes in sport are negative media images and the persistent under-representation of an ever-growing qualified collective of Black women and women of color globally. Therefore, the purpose of this pre-constituted panel is to (a) illuminate the experiential challenges for women of color in sport; (b) provide coping strategies to navigate the resultant challenges; and, (c) actively elucidate best practices to aid in the systemic decolonization of institutions to include higher education, collegiate athletics, and the range of sport and sport-related organizations.

Presenters:
Monique A. J. Smith
Dr. Aarti Ratna
Dr. Courtney L. Flowers
Dr. Joyce Olushola-Ogunrinde

Saturday November 9, 2019 12:10pm - 1:25pm EST
Princess Anne

12:10pm EST

Grappling with Athlete’s Intersectional Agencies in the Age of Social Media
Presenters:
Heather Van Mullem
Erin Pearson & Laura Misener
Kurt Spaetzel
Chadron Hazelbaker & John Collett

Saturday November 9, 2019 12:10pm - 1:25pm EST
Courtney Terrace

12:10pm EST

Stress, Coping, and Social Support in North American Sport II
Despite ample evidence of the salutary effects of sports participation, research suggests athletes participating in elite-level sport are at risk of suffering from a host of adverse mental health consequences as a result of stressors associated with competitive athletics including but not limited to power, control, and oppression. Furthermore, scholarship suggests that sports participants may cope with stressors in unhealthy or ineffective ways (e.g., through substance use or abuse, internalization, or denial). The purpose of this session is to explore new and innovative research on the stress experiences associated with sport, and on the sources of and barriers to effective coping and social support processes found among sport participants, with the overall goal of identifying evidence-based intervention strategies to effectively reduce sport-related strain and associated mental health consequences. Submissions related to this year’s conference theme of decolonial praxis are particularly encouraged, though all stress- and coping-related submissions are welcomed.

Presenters:
Matthew Wilkinson
Nikki Owens & Emeka Anaza
Wonjun Choi, Wonju Lee, Chungsup Lee, Matthew Haugen, Jon Welty Peachey & B. Christine Green

Saturday November 9, 2019 12:10pm - 1:25pm EST
Albemarle Hall

12:10pm EST

Theorizing and Narrativizing #MeToo and Gender Violence in Sport Culture
Created in 2006 by social activist Tarana Burke, #MeToo resurfaced in the fall of 2017 as women and men took to social media to offer support as survivors of sexual misconduct -- online and offline harassment, sexual assault, and rape. The hashtag came to symbolize resistance against a culture that has enabled sexual misconduct in a variety of contexts, which include the world of sport, the most prominent case of which was that of Larry Nassar, team doctor for the U.S. Gymnastics team. Scholars are encouraged to submit abstracts for papers that deepen and challenge our understanding of how phenomena that include, but are not limited to, rape culture and toxic masculinity inform (and are informed by) instances of sexual misconduct in sporting and physical culture. Papers that investigate the ways in which sportspeople have negotiated their own experiences with sexual misconduct -- and mediated representations thereof -- are also highly encouraged.

Presenters:
Kathryn Shea & Pamela Laucella
Guy Harrison
Angela Hattery, Earl Smith & Amanda Thomashow

Saturday November 9, 2019 12:10pm - 1:25pm EST
Spotswood Arms

1:25pm EST

3:00pm EST

HBCU Research in Physical Activity, Sport, and Athletics II
Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) are described by the Higher Education Act of 1965 as, “…any historically black college or university that was established prior to 1964, whose principal mission was, and is, the education of black Americans, and that is accredited by a nationally recognized accrediting agency or association determined by the Secretary [of Education]…” Currently, there are 101 HBCUs that offer doctoral, masters, and undergraduate degrees. However, the perceptions of HBCUs and resulting experiences in sport, education, and beyond are often undervalued or misrepresented. Thus, the purpose of this roundtable discussion session is to examine the state of HBCUs (to include successes and challenges) for faculty and students through the relevance of sport.

Presenters:
Kristal McGreggor & Ketra Armstrong
Geremy Cheeks
Andrew Dix
Robert Lindsey

Saturday November 9, 2019 3:00pm - 4:15pm EST
Peacock B

3:00pm EST

Political Economies of Sport and the Active Body – Athletic Labor Movements and Mobilities within the Political Economy of Sport
This session will provide a forum for scholars looking to share their research on the political economies of sport and the active body. Scholars are encouraged to submit both theoretical and empirical research on the behavioral, developmental, and sociological economies of sport, physical culture, and fitness active body. Submissions are welcome to take on a diverse array of subjects including (but not limited to) sport mega-events, professional sport leagues, sport stadiums and urban development, issues of social and economic (in)justice in collegiate sport, and economies of fitness and physical culture.

Presenters:
Wontak Kim
Charles D.T. Macaulay
Matthew Haugen
Tarlan Chahardovali

Saturday November 9, 2019 3:00pm - 4:15pm EST
Princess Anne

3:00pm EST

Science, technology, and sport II
This session invites papers that critically examine intersections of science, technology, and sport. While open to a variety of academic perspectives, we especially welcome papers that engage with science and technology studies or digital humanities approaches. Aligned with this year’s conference theme, we also encourage submissions exploring science, technology, and sport intersections through anti-oppressive research practice and indigenous ways of knowing. Potential topics include but are not limited to: decolonizing practices in sport science and technology; sport technologies and technologies of the active body; injury, risk, and sport medicine; doping, drugs, and bioethics; sports technologies and (dis)ability, gender, race, class, and sexuality; sport science labs and scientific practices; sport science and technologies in/as media; digital, immersive, or virtual realities in sports; and, sustainability and sport.

Presenters:
Braeden McKenzie
Christopher Scroggins, Grace Yan & Hanhan Xue
Sarah Barnes
CL Cole & Chamee Yang

Saturday November 9, 2019 3:00pm - 4:15pm EST
Courtney Terrace

3:00pm EST

Socio-Cultural, Economic, Ethical Issues Impacting the Future of College Athletics II
In 1929, the Carnegie Foundation issued a report detailing the major issues affecting college athletics. A number of the issues identified in the 1929 report still impact college athletics today. Issues associated with college athletics in 2019 include commercialization and the athletic arms race, recruiting violations, academic integrity problems, exploitation of minority athletes, a win at all costs attitude, unionization and fair compensation for athletes, Title IX and gender equity, college player violence and drug use, escalating coaching salaries, illegal behavior by coaches, sexual assault by athletes, athlete graduation rates, spiraling expenditures of college athletics, influence of television and the media, and the realignment of conferences. The purpose of this session is to explore issues that impact the future of college athletics from socio-cultural, economic, and ethical perspectives with the hope of shedding additional light on these issues and providing suggestions for their possible resolution in the future.

Presenters:
Dr. Brian Gearity, Ashley Yandt, Allison Perugini, Leslee A. Fisher, Matthew P. Bejar, Susannah K. Knust, Terilyn C. Shigeno, Leslie K. Larsen & Jamie M. Fynes
Dr. Kirsten Hextrum
Sam Winemiller, Adam Love, & Jason Stamm
Kristopher White
Dr. Robert Case

Saturday November 9, 2019 3:00pm - 4:15pm EST
Albemarle Hall

3:00pm EST

Sport & Transnationalism - Labor Flows, Difference, and Sport
Presenters:
Daniel Yu-Kuei Sun
Ryan Chen
Eileen Narcotta-Welp & Anna Baeth
Yang (Sunny) Zhang

Saturday November 9, 2019 3:00pm - 4:15pm EST
Peacock A

3:00pm EST

Title IX and Sport: Forging Pathways to Fight Oppression II
Gender equity remains a critical issue in college and high school athletics. Men were head coaches of 59.8 percent of women’s college teams in 2015-16 (NCAA, 2017). From 2011-2016, interscholastic boys’ participation opportunities increased by over 50,000 and the number of girls’ opportunities grew by over 150,000, yet “current girls” interscholastic participation numbers have never reached the boys pre-Title IX level (NCAA, 2017). Therefore, there is a need to deconstruct the ways in which power and oppression continue to influence intercollegiate and interscholastic athletic programs. Engagement in scholarship surrounding Title IX may forge pathways in confronting this injustice. Aligning with the conference theme of “decolonizing sport sociology,” this session seeks to highlight Title IX scholarship which sparks critical examination of gender equity in sport and challenges gender-based oppression, power, and marginalization in sports.

Presenters:
Dr. Miriam Merrill
Lawrence Hanks
Jorgen Bagger Kjaer

Saturday November 9, 2019 3:00pm - 4:15pm EST
Spotswood Arms